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Switched-Mode Power Supply (SMPS)

Definition - What does Switched-Mode Power Supply (SMPS) mean?

A switched-mode power supply (SMPS) is an electronic circuit that converts power using switching devices that are turned on and off at high frequencies, and storage components such as inductors or capacitors to supply power when the switching device is in its non-conduction state.

Switching power supplies have high efficiencies and are widely used in a variety of electronic equipment, including computers and other sensitive equipment requiring stable and efficient power supply.

A switched-mode power supply is also known as a switch-mode power supply or switching-mode power supply.

Techopedia explains Switched-Mode Power Supply (SMPS)

Switched-mode power supplies are classified according to the type of input and output voltages. The four major categories are:

  • AC to DC
  • DC to DC
  • DC to AC
  • AC to AC

A basic isolated AC to DC switched-mode power supply consists of:

  • Input rectifier and filter
  • Inverter consisting of switching devices such as MOSFETs
  • Transformer
  • Output rectifier and filter
  • Feedback and control circuit

The input DC supply from a rectifier or battery is fed to the inverter where it is turned on and off at high frequencies of between 20 KHz and 200 KHz by the switching MOSFET or power transistors. The high-frequency voltage pulses from the inverter are fed to the transformer primary winding, and the secondary AC output is rectified and smoothed to produce the required DC voltages. A feedback circuit monitors the output voltage and instructs the control circuit to adjust the duty cycle to maintain the output at the desired level.

There are different circuit configurations known as topologies, each having unique characteristics, advantages and modes of operation, which determines how the input power is transferred to the output.

Most of the commonly used topologies such as flyback, push-pull, half bridge and full bridge, consist of a transformer to provide isolation, voltage scaling, and multiple output voltages. The non-isolated configurations do not have a transformer and the power conversion is provided by the inductive energy transfer.

Advantages of switched-mode power supplies:

  • Higher efficiency of 68% to 90%
  • Regulated and reliable outputs regardless of variations in input supply voltage
  • Small size and lighter
  • Flexible technology
  • High power density

Disadvantages:

  • Generates EMI
  • Complex circuit design
  • Expensive compared to linear supplies

Switched mode power supplies are used to power a wide variety of equipment such as computers, sensitive electronics, battery-operated devices and other equipment requiring high efficiency.

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