Radio Frequency Shielding

What Does Radio Frequency Shielding Mean?

Radio frequency (RF) shielding is a solution used for blocking radio frequency interference. It involves the construction of an enclosure to reduce the electric and magnetic transmissions from one space to another. Radio frequency shielding helps to protect electronic and computer devices from radio frequency interference issues that can affect their performance and functionality.

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Radio frequency shielding is also known as radiation shielding.

Techopedia Explains Radio Frequency Shielding

Most electric and electronic devices produce radio frequency interference that could affect other nearby electric and electronic devices. The frequencies emitted from such devices could be captured by a special surveillance device that, in turn, could compromise the security and privacy of the source. Radio frequency shielding helps in reducing the levels of radio frequency radiation that leaves or enters the vicinity.

The design of radio frequency shielding is such that the range of frequencies is filtered under specific conditions. A high degree of effectiveness can be achieved with properly designed and constructed radio frequency shielding. The blocking or absorbance of radio frequency signals by the shielding is determined by many factors like the material used, the conductivity of the material, the material thickness, the permeability of the material, etc. Even air flow to the enclosure and mechanical strength of the shielding are factors for the shield. Copper is the most preferred material for radio frequency shielding, as it is capable of absorbing both magnetic and radio waves.

Radio frequency shielding is often provided for government and corporate buildings. Although radio frequency shielding can be a standalone solution, when used with other techniques like filtering and grounding it can be more cost effective.

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Margaret Rouse

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.