Interaction Management

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What Does Interaction Management Mean?

Interaction management is a broad term in IT that’s used to refer to the use of technologies that help to manage various interactions between users. These can include a wide variety of interactions, from financial transactions to interactions between colleagues or employees of a company.

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Techopedia Explains Interaction Management

One type of interaction management is called customer interaction management (CIM). This type of interaction management is a form of enterprise software that maintains an interactive bridge between a company and its customers or clients. A CIM solution may support multi-channel communications, such as email, text, telephone and instant messaging systems. These are the kinds of systems that employees use when reaching out to customers on a regular basis, for instance, in an outbound call center or sales department. Other types of interaction management systems are geared toward internal use in companies or businesses.

Interaction management tools may include processes that help managers or leaders to interact with their teams for better performance, delegation and team building. The basic idea of interaction management is that technology can help individual users to find resources, but it can also help multiple users to collaborate with each other. Whether it’s creating a better vehicle for customer interactions or promoting team building, interaction management software and systems are developed to enhance some interactive human process that can be improved with better access to data or some other IT resource.

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Margaret Rouse
Senior Editor
Margaret Rouse
Senior Editor

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.