BizTalk Server

What Does BizTalk Server Mean?

BizTalk Server is an enterprise service bus (ESB) developed by Microsoft that can connect to various business servers that might otherwise be unable to interconnect or communicate.

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Although the name might sugeest some sort of teleconferencing mechanism, BizTalk is intended for enterprise software to be able to communicate and share data such as purchase order or invoice details.

The BizTalk Server includes more than 25 multiplatform adapters as well as a stealth messaging infrastructure, allowing organizations to realize connectivity outside and inside their operations. It is best known for its superior integration functionality. The BizTalk Server is a form of business process management (BPM) solution. The “Biz” in BizTalk is short for business.

Techopedia Explains BizTalk Server

Other applications the BizTalk Server offers include:

  • IBM host/mainframe connectivity
  • Radio frequency identification
  • Electronic data interchange and connectivity
  • Business activity monitoring
  • Durable messaging

Microsoft’s BizTalk Server is also used in conjunction with the company’s BPM and start of authority domain name system record, along with enterprise service bus functions. ESB is a type of middleware system that integrates IT assets using a service-oriented approach that supports intelligent communication and relationships between non-related business components.

Overall, the BizTalk Server allows merchants to manage their supply chains from the factory to an online store. It also provides the infrastructure to connect applications, regardless of their platforms, and to develop, expose, and consume brand-new services. Proprietary and standards-based systems are connected with BizTalk Servers, which work with the .NET framework while providing connections to applications, platforms and the people using them.

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Margaret Rouse
Technology Expert

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.