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Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP)

Last updated: August 18, 2011

What Does Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) Mean?

Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP) is a redundancy routing protocol that establishes default fault tolerance and a framework for primary network gateway failover. HSRP is designed for multiaccess or broadcast local area networks (LAN) and supports non-disruptive Internet Protocol traffic inaccessibility.

HSRP is defined as RFC 2281.
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Techopedia Explains Hot Standby Router Protocol (HSRP)

HSRP features include:
  • Consistent IP routing protocol sets
  • Works in a bridging environment
  • Automatically self-updates when media access control (MAC) addresses are modified
  • High-priority HSRPs are virtual (or active) routers with predefined gateway IP addresses
  • HSRP groups or standby groups are HSRP router sets coordinated as illusory single active routers
  • HSRP group routers have universal IP and MAC addresses.
  • The virtual IP address for an HSRP group is the primary IP address LAN subnet and differs from other allocated interface addresses.

HSRP and active routers transmit messages on a periodic basis upon completion of protocol election. When an HSRP router fails or becomes an active router, the next standby router is selected to handle packet-forwarding duties. The active router then accepts and forwards traffic to the group’s virtual MAC address. When the active router leaves the LAN state, packet forwarding ends.

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NetworkingFile TransfersDataNetworking HardwareProtocolRouting

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