Gigabit Interface Converter

What Does Gigabit Interface Converter Mean?

A gigabit interface converter (GBIC) is a transceiver that converts optical signals to electrical signals and vice versa in a gigabit Ethernet or fiber to the home (FTTH) configuration. These interface converters were most common in early 2000s. GBIC is not obsolete, but has been largely replaced by a smaller and more lightweight version.

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Techopedia Explains Gigabit Interface Converter

A gigabit interface converter (GBIC) is an electrical interface that makes the gigabit port capable of supporting a large number of physical media through hundreds of kilometers. The transceiver is connected at the end of the Ethernet cable to facilitate signal conversion. A later variation of the GBIC, the small form-factor pluggable transceiver (SFP), is also called a mini-GBIC. The SFP performs the same functions but with a smaller form factor. The transceiver module is easily configurable and can be upgraded in opto-electrical systems without shutting off the system (hot swappable).

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Margaret Rouse

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.