Large-Scale Integration

What Does Large-Scale Integration Mean?

Large-scale integration (LSI) is the process of integrating or embedding thousands of transistors on a single silicon semiconductor microchip. LSI technology was conceived in the mid-1970s when computer processor microchips were under development.

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LSI is no longer in use. It was succeeded by very large-scale integration (VLSI) and ultra large-scale integration (ULSI) technologies.

Techopedia Explains Large-Scale Integration

LSI defines the technology used to build powerful microchips or integrated circuits (IC) in a very small form factor. It succeeded small-scale integration (SSI) and medium-scale integration (MSI), which included tens to hundreds of transistors per microchip. LSI consists of thousands of transistors that are closely embedded and integrated with a very small microchip.

One of the first components built on LSI technology was 1-K bit RAM, which contained 4,000 transistors. Later components and microprocessors held up to 10,000 embedded transistors.

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Margaret Rouse

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.