SQLite

Definition - What does SQLite mean?

SQLite is an in-process library that implements a self-contained, zero-configuration, serverless, transactional SQL database engine. The source code for SQLite exists in the public domain and is free for both private and commercial purposes.

SQLite has bindings to several programming languages such as C, C++, BASIC, C#, Python, Java and Delphi. The COM (ActiveX) wrapper makes SQLite accessible to scripted languages on Windows such as VB Script and JavaScript, thus adding capabilities to HTML applications. It is also available in embedded operating systems such as iOS, Android, Symbian OS, Maemo, Blackberry and WebOS because of its small size and ease of use.

Techopedia explains SQLite

SQLite is atomicity, consistency, isolation, durability (ACID) compliant. This embedded relational database management system is contained in a small C programming library and is an integral part of client-based applications. SQLite uses a dynamic SQL syntax and performs multitasking to do reads and writes at the same time. The reads and writes are done directly to ordinary disk files.

An SQLite library is called dynamically and application programs use SQLite functionality through simple function calls, reducing latency in database access. These programs store entire databases as single cross-platform files on host machines. This simple design is implemented by locking the entire database file during a write.

SQLite implements the SQL-92 standard for SQL and uses an unusual system for SQL compatible database management systems. Types are assigned to individual values, adding flexibility to columns when bound to dynamic scripting languages. Full unicode support in SQLIte is optional.

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