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Single Inline Package (SIP)

Definition - What does Single Inline Package (SIP) mean?

A single inline package (SIP) is a computer chip package that contains only a single row of connection pins. This is different from dual inline packages (DIP), which have two rows of connected pins.

A single inline package may also be known as a singline inline pin package (SIPP).

Techopedia explains Single Inline Package (SIP)

SIP is not as common as the dual in-line package (DIP); however, SIPs have been used to package multiple resistors and RAM chips with a common pin. By either using surface mounting device process or DIP process, SIPs collectively arrange RAM chips on a small board. The board alone includes a single row of pin leads, which connect to a particular socket on a system or a system-expansion board. SIPs are usually associated with memory modules. When compared with DIPs, which have a typical maximum I/O count of 64, SIPs usually consist of a typical maximum I/O count of 24, but with lower package expenditures.

Most small-form SIPs are parallel-array devices of common-value components, such as resistor arrays, diodes, etc. The large-form SIPs are often hybrid circuits, such as oscillators, timers, etc. The body of SIP is either made of ceramic or plastic, with a lead count usually ranging between four and 64. There are three SIP styles: molded, conformal coated and uncoated.

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