Voice Operated Switch

What Does Voice Operated Switch Mean?

A voice operated switch (VOX) is a switch used in telecommunications that operates when a sound is detected and exceeds a certain threshold. It is often used to turn a transmitter or recorder on when a user speaks and off when a user stops speaking.

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Instead of using a push-to-talk switch, recording devices commonly use a VOX to save storage space.

This term is also known as a voice operated exchange (VOX).

Techopedia Explains Voice Operated Switch

A VOX is commonly used as part of video conference or telepresence equipment. It is also used in cellular phones to preserve battery life. Cellular phones, two-way radios, phone recorders and tape recorders often have VOX as an option. On intercom systems, a VOX on the main console is often used in a room with a speaker, which serves as both a speaker and a microphone to monitor sounds such as conversation.

A VOX circuit takes only a voice or other sound to trigger it. It remains on as long as the sound remains above a certain volume or decibel level. The circuit automatically turns off when the volume drops below the minimum decibel level (after a short delay).

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Margaret Rouse

Margaret Rouse is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical, business audience. Over the past twenty years her explanations have appeared on TechTarget websites and she's been cited as an authority in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine and Discovery Magazine.Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages. If you have a suggestion for a new definition or how to improve a technical explanation, please email Margaret or contact her…