Cascading Style Sheets Level 2

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What Does Cascading Style Sheets Level 2 Mean?

Cascading Style Sheets Level 2 (CSS2) is the second version of cascading style sheets developed by W3C. It’s a declarative language used to enhance the hyperextensive text markup language. CSS2 is a subset of Cascading Style Sheets Level 1 and has enhanced capabilities like:

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  • Media types concept
  • Aural style sheets
  • Features for internationalization
  • Extended font selection
  • Automatic numbering and generated content
  • Cursors
  • Dynamic outlines
  • Capability to control content overflow, clipping
  • Absolute, fixed and relative positioning
  • Extended selector mechanism

Currently, W3C does not provide any CSS2 recommendations. CSS2 have backward compatibility, so all valid CSS1 is also valid CSS2.

Techopedia Explains Cascading Style Sheets Level 2

Compared to CSS1, which was short and concise, CSS2 was voluminous. CSS2 has the following main features:

  • Aural Style Sheets: New style properties for defining the aural style sheet for documents.
  • Paging:Definition of how pages need to be displayed or printed. This made cropping, registering marks and other layout features possible.
  • Media Types: Different style rules for different types of media was introduced in CSS2.
  • International Accessibility Features: More list styles were available for international documents. This included bidirectional text support as well as language sensitive quotation marks.
  • Font: More fonts were defined and available for use.
  • Positioning: CSS2 introduced the relative, absolute positioning and the placement determination within a document. This really helped the continuous media.
  • Cursors: CSS2 defined the manner in which the cursor would respond to various actions.
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Margaret Rouse
Senior Editor
Margaret Rouse
Senior Editor

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.