Data Intelligence

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What Does Data Intelligence Mean?

Data intelligence is the analysis of various forms of data in such a way that it can be used by companies to expand their services or investments. Data intelligence can also refer to companies’ use of internal data to analyze their own operations or workforce to make better decisions in the future. Business performance, data mining, online analytics, and event processing are all types of data that companies gather and use for data intelligence purposes.

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Techopedia Explains Data Intelligence

Data intelligence may sometimes be mistakenly referred to as business intelligence. Although there are some similarities between these two terms, there are also some key differences. Data intelligence focuses on data used for future endeavors like investments. Business intelligence, on the other hand, is the process of understanding a business process and the data associated with that process. Business intelligence involves organizing, rather than just gathering, data to make it useful and applicable to the business’s practices.

One type of business intelligence involves gathering online data from customers based on the types of social media e-commerce and merchant records available about them. Companies use this data to make sure their customers will be satisfied and keep coming back to them for services.

Privacy concerns can sometimes arise as a result of data intelligence gathering. Customers or clients may not want the companies they support to be eavesdropping on their personal online habits or get information about them from social networking sites.

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Margaret Rouse
Technology Expert
Margaret Rouse
Technology Expert

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.