ALERT

[FREE DEMO] Deploy Your Enterprise Cloud in Minutes

Beamforming

Definition - What does Beamforming mean?

Beamforming is a kind of radio frequency (RF) management in which an access point makes use of various antennas to transmit the exact same signal. Beamforming is considered a subset of smart antennas or Advanced Antenna Systems (AAS).

By broadcasting various signals and examining client feedback, the wireless LAN infrastructure could very well modify the signals it transmits. This way, it can identify the ideal path the signal must follow to get to a client device. Beamforming efficiently enhances the uplink and downlink SNR performances as well as the overall network capacity.

Beamforming is also known as spatial filtering.

Techopedia explains Beamforming

Beamforming entails an advanced algorithm that keeps track of several parameters, such as terminal location, speed, distance, the level of QoS required, signal/noise level and traffic type. This gives beamforming a greater advantage when it comes to signal improvement.
Beamforming functions by shaping the beam in the direction of the receiver. A number of antennas broadcast exactly the same signal; however, each one is specifically distorted in the phase. An algorithm applies a signature to every transmission.

The various transmitted shapes merge in the air by normal coherence of the electromagnetic waves, thereby forming a virtual "beam", which is a signal that is targeted toward the destination. If the beam travels to undesired locations (locations other than the destined receiver), the phases will collide and be destroyed.

In theory, the increase in the number of antennas used in the array results in a much stronger beamforming effect; every additional broadcast antenna could possibly double the signal.

Beamforming has several advantages:
  • Higher SNR: The highly directional transmission enhances the link budget, improving the range for both open-space as well as indoor penetration.
  • Interference prevention and rejection: Beamforming prevails over internal and external co-channel interference (CCI) by taking advantage of the antennas' spatial properties.
  • Higher network efficiency: By substantially minimizing CCI, beamforming allows much denser deployments compared to single antenna systems. The possibility of operating high-order modulations (16QAM, 64QAM ) greatly improves the overall capacity.

Techopedia Deals

Connect with us

Techopedia on Linkedin
Techopedia on Linkedin
Tweat cdn.techopedia.com
"Techopedia" on Twitter


'@Techopedia'
Sign up for Techopedia's Free Newsletter!

Email Newsletter

Join thousands of others with our weekly newsletter

Resources
The 4th Era of IT Infrastructure: Superconverged Systems
The 4th Era of IT Infrastructure: Superconverged Systems:
Learn the benefits and limitations of the 3 generations of IT infrastructure – siloed, converged and hyperconverged – and discover how the 4th...
Approaches and Benefits of Network Virtualization
Approaches and Benefits of Network Virtualization:
Businesses today aspire to achieve a software-defined datacenter (SDDC) to enhance business agility and reduce operational complexity. However, the...
Free E-Book: Public Cloud Guide
Free E-Book: Public Cloud Guide:
This white paper is for leaders of Operations, Engineering, or Infrastructure teams who are creating or executing an IT roadmap.
Free Tool: Virtual Health Monitor
Free Tool: Virtual Health Monitor:
Virtual Health Monitor is a free virtualization monitoring and reporting tool for VMware, Hyper-V, RHEV, and XenServer environments.
Free 30 Day Trial – Turbonomic
Free 30 Day Trial – Turbonomic:
Turbonomic delivers an autonomic platform where virtual and cloud environments self-manage in real-time to assure application performance.