Channel Bonding

Last Updated: June 12, 2018

Definition - What does Channel Bonding mean?

Channel bonding is a practice commonly used in IEEE 802.11 implementations in which two adjacent channels within a given frequency band are combined to increase throughput between two or more wireless devices.

Channel bonding is also known as Ethernet bonding, but it is used heavily in Wi-Fi implementations. It has become a very popular technique in the world of Wi-Fi because its increased throughput provides for more functionality within Wi-Fi deployments.

Channel bonding is also known as NIC bonding.

Techopedia explains Channel Bonding

Channel bonding is commonly practiced in Wi-Fi networks, which typically operate within the 2.4 GHz frequency band. The 2.4 GHz frequency band has room for three non-overlapping bonded channels. Within 802.11n deployments this translates into a theoretical throughput of 54 Mbps. The combination of these non-overlapping channels is often referred to as increasing the size of the pipe.

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