Transmedia

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What Does Transmedia Mean?

Transmedia is commonly defined as a narrative or project that combines multiple media forms. A transmedia project may combine many different types of prints or prose text, graphics and animation, or work across multiple platforms, such as different types of social media platforms, interactive websites or advertising outlets.

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Techopedia Explains Transmedia

Examples of transmedia in popular modern culture are abundant. Some point to the intersection of prose novels or copyrighted songs in arcade and video games. Others might suggest devices like the Amazon Kindle reflect the use of transmedia approaches. The inclusion or embedding of Facebook or social media content in other applications or websites can also be seen as a good example of transmedia efforts.

In general, deeper analysis of the transmedia phenomena often includes reference to Marshall McLuhan, a renowned theoretician and philosopher of the 20th century. McLuhan pioneered some of the theory around analyzing both the medium, and the message that is transmitted through it. Conversations about transmedia can incorporate some of McLuhan’s ideas, for example, analyzing the combined impact of a message and its surrounding medium. Transmedia also provides an opportunity to keep looking for new ways for businesses or other parties to connect with audiences in a media-rich culture.

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Margaret Rouse
Technology Expert
Margaret Rouse
Technology Expert

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.