Solution Architecture

What Does Solution Architecture Mean?

Solution architecture is the process of developing solutions based on predefined processes, guidelines and best practices with the objective that the developed solution fits within the enterprise architecture in terms of information architecture, system portfolios, integration requirements and many more.

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It can then be viewed as a combination of roles, processes and documentation that are intended to address specific business needs, requirements or problems through the design and development of applications and information systems.

Techopedia Explains Solution Architecture

Solution architecture is the initial step taken when an organization aims to create a set of enterprise solutions, applications and processes that integrate with each other in order to address specific needs and requirements and that often lead to software architecture and technical architecture work.

The solution architecture is described in a document that specifies a certain level of vision for all current and future solutions, applications and processes that the organization has. Design and development of solutions and applications then follow the guidelines specified in the solution architecture document to ensure that they conform to set standards that make integration and communication easier, and make the tracking of problems and inconsistencies between solutions easier as well.

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Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.