Predictive Alerting

What Does Predictive Alerting Mean?

Predictive alerting is technology that is able to provide predictions of certain
events or inputs. It is related to machine learning because the technology is
able to learn from the data it is regularly processing and based on its learning,
is able to make predictions which are actionable. The technology is used in many industries such as telecommunications, banking and finance, and defense.

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Techopedia Explains Predictive Alerting

Predictive
alerting is the output of a computing system able to learn from the data it has
been processing over a period of time. For example, the system stores and
processes financial data in a large bank and a certain number of users are
given conditional access to the system and each user has certain ways to access
the system. If a user tries to access the system in a different way, say,
with a new device, the system sets off a predictive alert.

Predictive alerting is
highly useful in applications such as preventing fraudulent transactions in the banking sector or
predicting customer churn in companies. Predictive alerting is different from
other alerting systems such as rule-based alerting because it adapts and
learns from new data sets which can be varied and complex in nature. Rule-based
alerts, on the other hand, can work only based on preconfigured rules and may
not be suitable for real-life scenarios.

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Margaret Rouse

Margaret Rouse is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical, business audience. Over the past twenty years her explanations have appeared on TechTarget websites and she's been cited as an authority in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine and Discovery Magazine.Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages. If you have a suggestion for a new definition or how to improve a technical explanation, please email Margaret or contact her…