Deep Convolutional Inverse Graphics Network (DC-IGN)

Definition - What does Deep Convolutional Inverse Graphics Network (DC-IGN) mean?

The deep convolutional inverse graphics network (DC-IGN) is a particular type of convolutional neural network that is aimed at relating graphics representations to images. Experts explain that a deep convolutional inverse graphics network uses a “vision as inverse graphics” paradigm that uses elements like lighting, object location, texture and other aspects of image design for very sophisticated image processing.

Techopedia explains Deep Convolutional Inverse Graphics Network (DC-IGN)

The deep convolutional inverse graphics network has a model that includes an “encoder” and a “decoder” – it is a type of neural network that uses various layers to process input to output results. A typical feedforward neural network includes an input layer, hidden layers and output layer. The deep convolutional inverse graphics network uses initial layers to encode through various convolutions, utilizing max pooling, and then uses subsequent layers to decode with unpooling. Throughout this process, the network uses “scene latent variables” and aspects of gradient descent and backpropagation to learn how to represent aspects of images.

As for popular applications of deep convolutional inverse graphics networks, these networks are often used to create variable outputs for an object such as, for example, a human face. By training the model, the deep convolutional inverse graphics network can work up a dynamic rendering engine based on aspects like angle and shade. The end result is a more intelligent ability to manipulate sophisticated three-dimensional images.

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