Point-To-Point Videoconference

What Does Point-To-Point Videoconference Mean?

A point-to-point videoconference is a type of videoconference that is limited to two locations, versus a multi-point videoconference, which may include more than two locations. Each type uses technologies that require different types of video conferencing setups.

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Techopedia Explains Point-To-Point Videoconference

A point-to-point videoconference was the norm with traditional video conferencing setups (like closed-circuit TV), making multi-point videoconferencing extremely difficult. Today, digital telecom and related technologies have streamlined multi-point videoconferencing, as digital data streams use sophisticated videoconferencing resources to facilitate the syncing of various location signals.

Point-to-point videoconferencing is still popularly used with common IT teleconferencing tools, such as Skype. A benefit is that syncing the two signals does not require a bridge or other sophisticated system. Also, unlike many multi-point systems, there is a better chance of a clearer signal and less lag time.

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Margaret Rouse
Technology Expert

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.