Address Space

What Does Address Space Mean?

An address space is a range of valid addresses in memory that are available for a program or process. That is, it is the memory that a program or process can access. The memory can be either physical or virtual and is used for executing instructions and storing data.

Advertisements

Techopedia Explains Address Space

On a computer, each process and device is allocated an address space, which holds a certain portion of the processor’s address space. The processor’s address space is typically restricted to the width of its registers and address bus.

Address space is often classified as either flat, where the addresses are represented as incrementally increasing integers that start at zero, or segmented, where the addresses are portrayed as independent segments augmented by offsets. In some systems, the address space may be modified from one format to the other via a process generally known as thunking.

The size of an address space can be made larger than that of physical memory by using a memory management technique called virtual memory. A virtual memory, also known as a page file, is actually a physical file on disk that acts like an additional RAM or RAM module. Thus, an address space consists of both physical memory and virtual memory.

Advertisements

Related Terms

Margaret Rouse

Margaret Rouse is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical, business audience. Over the past twenty years her explanations have appeared on TechTarget websites and she's been cited as an authority in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine and Discovery Magazine.Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages. If you have a suggestion for a new definition or how to improve a technical explanation, please email Margaret or contact her…