Organic Search Engine Optimization

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What Does Organic Search Engine Optimization Mean?

Organic search engine optimization (organic SEO) refers to the methods used to obtain a high placement (or ranking) on a search engine results page in unpaid, algorithm-driven results on a given search engine. Methods such as boosting keywords, backlinking and writing high-quality content can all improve a site’s page rank. Black hat SEO methods, such as the use of keyword stuffing and link farming, can also boost organic SEO.

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Sites using organic SEO in the truest sense will be much like organisms, meaning they will grow, expand and adapt over time in response to readers' desires.

Techopedia Explains Organic Search Engine Optimization

The term “organic” refers to something having the characteristics of an organism. Although black hat SEO methods may boost a website’s search engine page rank in the short term, these methods could also get the site banned from the search engines altogether. However, it is more likely that readers will recognize the low quality of sites employing black hat SEO at the expense of the reader experience, which will reduce the site’s traffic and page rank over time.

Organic SEO can be achieved by:

  • Optimizing the Web page with relevant content
  • Spreading links pointing to the content
  • Incorporating metatags and other types of tag attributes

Organic SEO methods mainly rely on the relevancy of the content they offer. Some of the benefits of organic SEO include:

  • Generates more clicks as the organically optimized sites offer relevant content related to the keywords searched
  • Again, due to the content relevancy, the search engine results will last longer.
  • Builds greater trust among the users
  • Very cost-effective when compared to paid listings
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Margaret Rouse
Senior Editor
Margaret Rouse
Senior Editor

Margaret is an award-winning technical writer and teacher known for her ability to explain complex technical subjects to a non-technical business audience. Over the past twenty years, her IT definitions have been published by Que in an encyclopedia of technology terms and cited in articles by the New York Times, Time Magazine, USA Today, ZDNet, PC Magazine, and Discovery Magazine. She joined Techopedia in 2011. Margaret's idea of a fun day is helping IT and business professionals learn to speak each other’s highly specialized languages.